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Some Longtown Families

Some Longtown Families

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George Graham, clockmaker and astronomerGeorge Graham was born about 1675 in Kirklinton, though not much is known about his origins. In his "Worthies of Cumberland" published in 1875, Henry Lonsdale gives Graham's probable birthdate as 1673, the son of George Graham of Rigg, recorded in the Quaker register, although other sources say he was born at Horsegills in Kirklinton. He was brought up by his brother William, his father having died when he was young.He travelled to London in 1688, and was apprenticed to a clockmaker named Aske; later he worked for Thomas Tompion, the eminent clockmaker. He was elected into the Royal Society in 1720. Although he started as a clockmaker, his astronomical instruments were those which brought him most acclaim.When he died in 1751, he was buried in Westminster Abbey in the same grave as Thomas Tompion.The Blaylock ClockmakersThe Blaylock clockmaking family began working in Longtown in the year 1768. The business was founded by John Blaylock (1) who was born in 1736 at a place called Hunter's Holme on the north bank of the river Lyne in the parish of Arthuret. He was the son of Edward Blacklock and the former Jenetta Coltherd who had married at St. Michael and All Angels' church, Longtown on 26th May 1730. The family name is usually written as Blacklock in the early parish registers but all their known clocks are signed Blaylock. John Blaylock (1) was apprenticed to the clockmaker Archibald Lawrie of Carlisle on 2nd February 1753 for a premium of £10 and on completion of his apprenticeship it is thought he continued in the employment of the Lawrie family until 1767. On 14th February 1767 John married Hannah Liddell of Burgh by Sands at the church of St. Mary, Carlisle. Soon after the marriage the couple moved to Longtown where John commenced working as a clockmaker. It is believed they also had a small grocery business. About the year 1795, two sons, John (2) and William (1) joined their father in the clockmaking business. John (1) died in 1803 and his two sons carried on working in Longtown until they moved to Carlisle in 1817. The clocks made by the family whilst in Longtown are chiefly longcase, otherwise known as grandfather clocks. Both 30 hour and 8 day examples were made. The early clocks have brass dials often with very high quality engraving. From about 1795 the family began to make clocks with the then more fashionable painted dials. A number of watches made by the family in Longtown are also recorded. John (1), John (2) and William (1) are buried in the churchyard of St. Michael and All Angels', Longtown, parish of Arthuret.Thanks to John Blaylock for this informationThe Edgar familyWilliam Edgar of the famous London Department store, Swan and Edgar, was born in Arthuret in 1791. His brother John Edgar was a grocer in Rickergate, Carlisle, who drowned in the river Petteril in 1834.The Ferguson familyThe Fergusons are reputed to have been landowners in the north of Cumberland since the days of Queen Elizabeth I. They are said to have come originally from Galloway and to be a branch of the Fergusons of Craigdarroch. The first that we have named is Adam Ferguson [d. 1642]. He lived at Bush upon Lyne, Longtown, Cumberland and probably moved there from Easton. He was mentioned by name in the Protestation Oath of 1641.The Fergusons continued to be farmers and landowners in the parishes of Arthuret and Kirkandrews on Esk for over two hundred years. From the 1740s they also started up as cotton industrialists in Carlisle and through their descendants, the Dixons and Chances, continued in that business until well into the 20th century.They also had an input into the civic and political life of Carlisle and many Fergusons and their descendants were mayors of the city and MPs including:Sir Frederick William Chance MP KBE, (1852-1932). Mayor of Carlisle 1903-1904.Sir Robert Christopher Chance KBE DL JP, (1883-1960). Mayor of Carlisle 1929-1930.Francis Peter Dixon JP, (1849-1927). Mayor of Carlisle on four occasions, the first two being 1883-1884 and 1897-1898.George Dixon, (1793-1860). Mayor of Carlisle 1842-43 and 1848-1849.John Dixon of Knells JP, (1785-1857). Mayor of Carlisle 1839-1840-1841.Peter Dixon of Holme Eden, (1789-1866). Mayor of Carlisle between 1838-1839.Peter James Dixon JP, (1820-95). Mayor of Carlisle between 1853-1854.Joseph Ferguson MP of Holme Head, (1788-1863). Mayor of Carlisle 1836-1837.Chancellor Richard Saul Ferguson MA, LLM, FSA, (1837-1900). Mayor of Carlisle 1881-1882 and 1882-1883.Robert Ferguson MP FSA, (1817-98). Mayor of Carlisle in 1855 and 1858.Captain Spencer Charles Ferguson, (1868-1958). Mayor of Carlisle 1912-1914.James Graham of Knells, (1705-58). Mayor of the Carlisle in 1747.Thomas Nanson JP, (1801-). Mayor of Carlisle 1865.Archibald McIntyreArchibald McIntyre, son of Peter McIntyre from Scotland and Elizabeth Blaylock from Moat in Kirkandrews, was born on 19 October 1828 at Netherby. Elizabeth Blaylock was the daughter of Thomas Blaylock (1755-1843) a farmer at Moat under Sir JRG Graham and his father for over 60 years, who was in turn the son of Thomas Blaylock (1717-1796) of Riddings and Moat. Archibald moved at an early age to Warwick Bridge where his father was head gardener to Peter Dixon at Holme Eden, and Archibald served his apprenticeship here. He then worked for a short time with the nurserymen Little and Ballantyne in Carlisle before spending a couple of years as second in command to Mr Burns, head gardener of the Marquis of Aylesbury at Tottenham House, Savernake Forest.Archibald was appointed head gardener to the Earl of Clare at Mount Shannon, near Limerick in the 1850s. After the death of the Earl, Archibald went to London as outdoor foreman in the Royal Gardens, Kew before becoming head gardener at Pampisford Hall, Cambridgeshire the seat of W. Parker Hammond, which he “transformed from a rough meadow to a place of beauty and where he took a prominent part in getting together and planting the magnificent collections of conifers for which that place is famous”.Finally Archibald held the post of Superintendent of Victoria and Greenwich Parks in London for about 13 years and became well known in the gardening world as”eminently successful” particularly for the carpet bedding schemes at Victoria Park. He died 4th June 1887.(Thanks to Fay Winkworth for this information)The Moody FamilyThomas Moody of Longtown was born c1733, and married Barbara Blamire from St Cuthbert’s parish in 1768. They had three sons, Charles, George and Thomas. Charles and George stayed in Longtown, where George was a surgeon. Thomas emigrated to Barbados where he later became commissioned in the field into the Royal Engineers, ending his career as a Colonel. His son Richard Clement Moody also became an officer in the Royal Engineers, and was as a Lieutenant the first Governor of the Falkland Islands. Later in his career, he opened up the Western Terminal of the Canadian Pacific Railway. He reached the rank of General, dying in Bournemouth in 1887.Of the other sons of Thomas Moody:Thomas got a commission in the 77th Regiment of Foot, and later was a Major in the East Kent regiment.Hampden Moody also became a Colonel in the Royal Engineers.James Leith Moody became chaplain to the Forces and later was vicar of St John the Baptist, Enfield.Reginald Frederick Moody had a long career in the ministry and ended as vicar of Tetley, Surrey.William James Moody was in the ministry in the West Indies, and ended as Vicar of All Saints, Runcorn in Cheshire.Clement Moody, the son of George Moody, surgeon of Longtown, also became a vicar, and was at Sebergham before ending up at St Nicholas Cathedral in Newcastle upon Tyne.Thanks to Bill Anderson for that : he is researching the Moody family and has a lot more information about them. If you want to contact him, you can e-mail me and I will forward it.David LockhartDavid Lockhart, plant hunter and botanist, was born at Moat in the parish of Kirkandrews on Esk, the illegitimate son of a cottager on the Netherby Estate. He was the first superintendent of the botanical gardens in Trinidad from 1818 until his death in 1845. He was a gardener at Kew in 1816 when he was chosen by Sir Joseph Banks as assistant to the Norwegian botanist Christen Smith on Captain James Tuckey’s expedition to the Congo. Although the expedition ended in failure, Lockhart brought back a large collection of plants to Sir Joseph Banks at Kew: soon afterwards he was appointed superintendent of the new botanical gardens at Trinidad. As superintendent, Lockhart helped the Governor Sir Ralph Woodford to lay out the gardens; in the following years he continued to send specimens back to Kew, including many orchids; the Lockhartia genus of orchids is named after him. In 1831 he was awarded the RSA gold medal for his cultivation of nutmeg and mace in Trinidad. In his will, proved in Trinidad, he left £100 for the support of Moat school. His father, John Lockhart, died in 1841 and is buried at Kirkandrews on Esk: David Lockhart is mentioned on his mother’s gravestone at Arthuret churchyard.The Tate and Latimer FamiliesGeorge TATE (1785 - 1854) of the King's Arms, Swan Street in Longtown married Margaret THOMPSON and they had 8 children. Their daughter Margaret TATE (1821 - 1896) married Robert LATIMER (1812 - 1860). Robert Latimer was with the railway, and his ended his career in Tebay, Westmorland, where he was station master. He was laid to rest with other Latimer family members at the Arthuret Church, Longtown. Robert and Margaret Latimer had 10 children: 4 baptized at Arthuret, 5 born in Lancaster and the last one born in Tebay, Westmorland. Their 9th child, Andrew LATIMER (1857 – 1912) was chief steward of the Titanic, and perished in that tragedy. (Thanks to Gayle Mann for this information)The Bell Family of Horsgills In November 1843 The Carlisle Patriot announced a local marriage: “At Kirklinton on the 8th inst, Mr John James Henderson of Justus Town, to Miss Bell of the Horsegills.” His father was Robert Henderson; hers was Joseph Bell. Both families had moved fairly recently, the Bells from Burtholme and the Hendersons from Hesket. But while the Bells had been yeoman farmers in the Lanercost area for several centuries, the Hendersons were drovers and graziers from Shap and before that from the parish of Hoddom in Dumfries.The Bells had built up their landholding around Lanercost over the years. The most active were Thomas Bell of Burtholme, “yeoman” in the 1740s and 1750s and Joseph Bell “Esq” in the 1840s even after he moved home to Horsgills. Joseph married Margaret Thirlwall on 6 January 1825 at Lanercost Abbey. Margaret died in early 1842, soon after their eldest daughter Mary who was just 17. These deaths may be what prompted Joseph to move to Horsgills. He also lost his brothers Mathew, James and Thomas in a short period of time. Thomas was a successful hop factor in Clerkenwell with property in the Midlands; after he died intestate his property eventually went to Joseph’s surviving children: Jane wife of John James Henderson: Anne wife of William Bell; James; Thomas; Hannah wife of George McLeod and Margaret wife of James Little. (Contributed by Fiona Martin)William IrvingWilliam Irving, (c1797 -1859) the son of Walter Irving, a painter from Longtown, was a portrait painter who started his career in Longtown painting portraits of a number of local people including David Lang, the Gretna "priest". He left the area in about 1824 for London, but died in St Mary's Workhouse in Carlisle in 1859, and is remembered on his family's memorial in Arthuret Churchyard. His portrait of David Lang hangs in Old Tullie House, Carlisle.The Story FamilyThe Story family from Justicetown near Longtown included both the famous Quaker Thomas Story and his brother George Story, Dean of Limerick, and chaplain to King William's army at the Battle of the Boyne. Another brother Ensign Christopher Story of Justice Town was killed in a skirmish in The GRAHAM family at Cubbiehill Cubbiehill (later Cubby Hill) is a farm on the Netherby estate about 4 miles North of Longtown and on the south side of Scots Dyke. Three generations of the GRAHAM family farmed there over almost 90 years.The Weather and the Crops in the North. Northampton Mercury 20th June 1868A correspondent writing from Englishtown, near Carlisle, Cumberland, under the date of June 16th says: …..This locality has produced some energetic and enterprising men, many of whom have been eminently successful. Mr. GRAHAM, the large upholsterer in Holborn, London, sprung from Cubby-hill, the adjoining farm to this; Mr. EDGAR, of the firm of ‘Swan and Edgar,’ from Redbank, a little way further off. …. Peter GRAHAM (1740- 1825) and his wife Ann (nee NICHOL) were tenants at Cubby Hill arriving from Bankhead, Canonbie, Dumfriesshire after the death of the previous tenants (Thomas FERGUSON in 1785 and his wife Margaret in 1790.) Of Peter and Ann’s six children (all born at Bankhead) three were boys. George GRAHAM (1783-1847) became a surgeon in Brampton and John GRAHAM (1789-1838) - the youngest – left for Edinburgh and then London to become a silk mercer. John was a colleague and contemporary of William EDGAR -from Redbank, establishing partnerships in his silk business first in Oxford Street and later on his own in High Holborn. Peter and Ann’s oldest son, William GRAHAM (1781 – 1849) took over the lease of the farm on the death of his father. William married Elizabeth ARMSTRONG and together they had 12 children all born at Cubby Hill. (There is a fine headstone in the churchyard at Kirkandrews-upon-Esk which includes all but three of them.) Jane GRAHAM (1808-1879), Ann GRAHAM (1812-1903) and Elizabeth GRAHAM (1823-1908) all married farmers, Elizabeth later left with her family for Canada. James GRAHAM (1814-1890) became a farmer and breeder of many prizewinning Galloway cattle. Carlisle Patriot October 20th 1849 At Cubbyhill on the 6th inst Mr William Graham, farmer there - a man of extraordinary energy of character. In his profession he was deemed a first-rate cultivator, and an excellent judge of everything connected with land. As his skill in this respect, combined with faithfulness, was known to and appreciated by a wide circle, he was frequently appointed a referee, a duty, however troublesome, he willingly performed to the satisfaction of all parties. The deceased was much esteemed by his landlord Sir James Graham of Netherby, who repeatedly visited him during his illness, and attended the funeral. He was followed to the grave by seven sons, men strongly resembling their sire in activity and prosperous in their different callings.George GRAHAM (1818-1893) continued to farm at Cubby Hill after his father’s death later farming at OAKBANK, another Netherby farm closer to Longtown. Sibella GRAHAM (1824-1902) ran a boarding house in Silloth. Janet GRAHAM (1816-1833) died young. The five remaining brothers left agriculture and headed to London. John GRAHAM (1820-1893) first qualified in Edinburgh as a doctor and joined his Uncle George GRAHAM’s medical partnership in Brampton but by 1861 John had married, left Brampton and given up medicine becoming instead a “soap boiler” in partnership at Morgan’s Soap Works in Tottenham Court Road. He stayed in business in London until 1882. William GRAHAM (1827-1867) became an Oil and Seed broker, his brother Walter GRAHAM (1831-1910) a “Seed Crusher” with Oil Seed Mills supplying Oil Cake and cattle feed throughout the country. Peter GRAHAM (1810-1877) and his younger brother Forster GRAHAM (1829-1888) present the most extraordinary contrast with their birth on the farm. Peter was the first of his siblings to go to London where he joined his Uncle John’s business in Holborn, by now Silk merchants, Carpet manufacturers, Upholsterers etc.- ‘their stock is the largest and most splendid in Europe’. By 1836 Peter had left his Uncle’s shops and set up in partnership with T.C. JACKSON in business in Oxford Street trading as “JACKSON & GRAHAM”. TC JACKSON died just 12 years later. Forster joined his brother in the business as eventually did two of Peter GRAHAM’s sons and two of his nephews. “JACKSON & GRAHAM” became a highly fashionable destination, their clients, as they proudly proclaimed, including Queen Victoria, Napoleon III, the Grand Khedive at Cairo and the royal palace in Siam. “JACKSON & GRAHAM” had extensive showrooms at “29, 33, 34, 35, 37 & 38, Oxford Street and with manufactories at Perry’s Place, Freston Place & Newman Yard adjoining. By appointment to Her Majesty and the Emperor Napoleon III; Prize medal, Great Exhibition of 1851; Gold Medal of Honour, Exposition Universelle, Paris, 1855; Medal for “Great Excellence in Design and Workmanship”, International Exhibition, 1862”. At the Paris International Exhibition of 1878, it was noted of them ‘the workmanship is so perfect that even with the aid of a magnifying glass scarcely the slightest imperfection is to be found’. Forster GRAHAM was awarded the Legion d’Honneur after the Paris Exhibition. “JACKSON & GRAHAM” were particularly noted for their fine marquetry work, the use of Wedgwood plaques, ivory inlay, rare woods, and fine casting of bronze mounts. They engaged the leading designers of the period, including Owen Jones. In 1885 as tastes were changing and the Arts and Crafts movement was emerging the company was bought and taken over by two former employees. Peter had died eight years before the takeover and was buried in London. Three years later Forster was in Paris when he died; his body was returned to Kirkandrews-upon-Esk where he is buried. Although frequenting a very different world from their roots in Cumberland the London brothers from Cubby Hill continued to play an active part in supporting the work of the Cumberland Benevolent Institution and its fund raising activities in London. Meanwhile back at Cubby Hill after 1871 (and before 1881) George GRAHAM and his wife Jane left for Oakbank. After almost 90 years the GRAHAM family was no longer at Cubby Hill, the SAUNDERS family from Beck taking on the tenancy.Today “JACKSON & GRAHAM” furniture commands high prices on the London and New York Antique markets. Many of their finest pieces are in private collections but samples of their exhibition pieces can be seen in The Victoria and Albert Museum in London and in the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge.(Thanks to Martin Graham for this information)